Thousands of supporters turn out for Komen Race for the Cure

Since 1982, the Susan G. Komen organization has been a shining example of charity and goodwill during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and throughout the entire year.

Since 1982, the Susan G. Komen organization has been a shining example of charity and goodwill during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and throughout the entire year. 

Founded out of a promise from one sister to another, the goal has always been to raise awareness and strive to find a cure for breast cancer. Nancy Brinker ensured her dying sister, Susan Komen, that she would do whatever it took to bring an end to the disease. Now, charity events take place across the country in order to fund and support scientific efforts toward ending breast cancer.

One such event - the Komen Race for the Cure - has been going on in locations all across the U.S. This race is a collection of runs and fitness walks, and is one of the largest fundraising events around. 

Race for the Cure draws thousands
Recently, Komen races across the country have punctuated another successful National Breast Cancer Awareness month.

This year marks the last time such an event will take place in Tampa Bay, Fla., but many people still showed up to demonstrate support, according to a local ABC News affiliate. In total, 850 men and women participated in this Florida walk alone, while many more people flocked to the organization's other scheduled locations. Broken up into three legs at 20 miles apiece, the walk is a fantastic way for survivors, friends and family to show their support for a good cause.

In Knoxville, Tenn., thousands of runners turned out for the area's own Komen Race for the Cure, according the WBIR.com. Early Saturday, Oct. 26, the group began the 5k run throughout the city's downtown area. For many, the work performed by Susan G. Komen is a perfect opportunity to remember those who have lost their battle with breast cancer, honor survivors and encourage those fighting. Pink race bibs dotted the streets, adorned by those who have successfully beaten the disease.

"It makes me cry," Kelli McKinnish, cancer survivor and resident of Canton, N.C., told the news source. "It makes me grateful for every minute that I draw in a breath because I could not be doing that right now were it not for things like the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure."

Courthouse Retrieval System, a provider of property data and other real estate records, supports the Komen Race for the Cure. All across the country, supporters have helped raise awareness and money toward finding an end of breast cancer, with plenty of positive results already seen.



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